Paul Taylor

Hypnotherapy and Homeopathy in Tunbridge Wells town centre

When considering hypnotherapy for smoking cessation, many people want to know "Does it really work?".

There are studies that suggest hypnosis to be a most effective method for stopping smoking (i), (ii), (iii) and this must be in no small part due to the fact that hypnotherapy can not only both anticipate and mitigate some of the problems associated with stopping, but also deal with the reasons why the habit was started in the first place.

Stopping smoking with hypnosis is therefore not only quite possible but can also be easier than you think with not just the well documented benefits for physical health but for mental health also with research showing former smokers to be happier than when they smoked (iv) with less stress, improvements in mental health and being less likely to suffer from anxiety or depression in the future (v).

And so if you are motivated and ready to make the change (remember hypnosis cannot make you do anything that you don't really want to do), then there is every chance that you will join the countless numbers of people (including myself) that have used hypnosis to not only stop smoking but also to remain a non-smoker - permanently. 

The first session is then, of a preparatory nature, assessing all the above factors and determining which of a number of techniques and strategies will be best for you personally. The second session will be for cessation itself, tailored to your own personal requirements based on what you have told me in session one. Most people will require only two sessions - unless something unforseen arises - though a third may occasionally be required - and these are at my usual fee of £50 per session. 

I offer a free, no obligation introductory consultation if you would like to meet with me first, in person in Tunbridge Wells town centre or via Skype. Alternatively I would love to receive any questions you may have via email here.

Thanks for reading and here are some of those research references:

 

(i) Science News from research organizations: Hypnotherapy For Smoking Cessation Sees Strong Results. Date: October 24, 2007 Source: American College of Chest Physicians. Summary: Hospitalized patients who smoke may be more likely to quit smoking through the use of hypnotherapy than patients using other smoking cessation methods. Smoking patients who participated in one hypnotherapy session were more likely to be nonsmokers at 6 months compared with patients using nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) alone or patients who quit "cold turkey." http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/10/071022124741.htm

 

(ii). International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis Volume 52, Issue 1, 2004 Original Articles Clinical Hypnosis For Smoking Cessation: Preliminary Results of a Three-Session Intervention. DOI:10.1076/iceh.52.1.73.23921 Gary R. Elkins & M. Hasan Rajab pages 73-81. Published online: 09 Aug 2010 Abstract :This study presents preliminary data regarding hypnosis treatment for smoking cessation in a clinical setting. An individualized, 3-session hypnosis treatment is described. Thirty smokers enrolled in an HMO were referred by their primary physician for treatment. Twenty-one patients returned after an initial consultation and received hypnosis for smoking cessation. At the end of treatment, 81% of those patients reported that they had stopped smoking, and 48% reported abstinence at 12 months posttreatment. Most patients (95%) were satisfied with the treatment they received.

 

(iii). Hypnosis Patients Twice As Likely To Remain Smoke-Free After Two Years. Study of 71 smokers showed that after a two-year follow up, patients that quit with hypnosis were twice as likely to remain smoke-free than those who quit on their own. https://sigmapubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1547-5069.2005.00042.x

 

(iv). Do ex-smokers report feeling happier following cessation? Evidence from a cross-sectional survey. Nicotine Tob Res. 2009 May;11(5):553-7. doi: 10.1093/ntr/ntp031. Epub 2009 Apr 7. Shahab L 1, West R. Author information 1Cancer Research UK Health Behaviour Research Centre, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, 2-16 Torrington Place, London, WC1E 6BT, UK. lion.shahab @ucl.ac.uk Available to view at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19351779

 

(v). Change in mental health after smoking cessation: systematic review and meta-analysis https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/24524926/